Miigwech for the condolences. She was a month shy of 99 years old. Smoke and drank and played cards up till the end. My grandma is pretty tore up about it. We’re gonna try to juggle who’s going up for the funeral and who’s gonna have to stay behind to care for grandpa

Great grandma died this morning. Grandma got off work way too early, I asked if she was okay, she told me her mom died. Everything seems to hit at once…

artisticaction:

Dear tumblr folks

My name is Ryan (they/them/their) and I am a queer, Indigenous artist. I am Lac du Flambeau Ojibwe and an aspiring artist and fashion photographer. I am currently fundraising so I will have the opportunity to attend the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe in the fall. 

Finances have been the biggest struggle so far. a lot of my money went to an institution that was neither culturally competent or supportive towards my needs as a native artist. A lot of my work was misidentified with the wrong cultures, I was told I should include more “headdresses” in my work. So I need to go to IAIA because it will give me the education I crave, need, deserve, and clearly earned through 3 years of struggling at another university that could not and did not provide the tools for me to succeed. 

This is a space that is focused on the art i want to bring and will allow me the opportunities and the work spaces to grow and become a better artist. 

Please consider donating and help this 2 spirit individual successfully travel to and occupy a space that was created for me and will provide the necessary support. 

All funding will go to cover transportation.

Links:

GoFundMe page: http://www.gofundme.com/b0me1k

Facebook Photography page to see more of my work: http://www.facebook.com/RMYoungPhotography 

My project “Indigeneity” was also featured in Native Max Magazine!

http://jaezbrainlint.tumblr.com/post/72434829809#notes

Finally, a link to the Indigeneity Project: http://indigeneityproject.wordpress.com/

Anything you can donate would be amazing <3 If you aren’t able to donate, please help signal boost this post by reblogging it to your page! 

Chi Miigwetch

8,688 plays

sassyqunari:

ITS COMING OUT ON MY BIRTHDAY NOW WHAT?!  I KNOW WHAT I’M ASKING FOR!

jukubabii:

yeah I be swimmin smoking seaweed out my conch shell

ugh he&#8217;s so pretty. 

jukubabii:

yeah I be swimmin
smoking seaweed out my conch shell

ugh he’s so pretty. 

Cranberries - Zombie
10,707 plays

currentrotation:

"Zombie" by Cranberries

"And if violence causes silence, who are we mistaken…"

impartart:

Relief of a dancing maenad, c. 27 B.C.-14 A.D.; Augustan Roman copy of a Greek relief attributed to Kallimachos, c. 425-400 B.C., Pentelic marble; The MET

impartart:

Relief of a dancing maenad, c. 27 B.C.-14 A.D.; Augustan Roman copy of a Greek relief attributed to Kallimachos, c. 425-400 B.C., Pentelic marble; The MET

sixpenceee:

I remember seeing this short film a long time ago. Basically, this little machine sees a television with a pretty doll face. She wants to be just like what she sees on t.v, and changes her appearance. The standards get higher and higher (literally), but she tries earnestly.

You can see what happens in the end.This video leaves a powerful message about how our standards of beauty are too high and soon it becomes out of reach.

As one of the comments of the video says

"She was original but she died a copy."

Watch Video

pazzano:

feministwerewolf:

alrighty, i got some info from my grandma about my dad’s side of the family and maybe need a little help from everyone to track something down? My nokomis had a sister named Fern Barnes (Married name Zeman) who apparently wrote a couple of books on our family and the indigenous folk of michigan in…

I couldn’t find much, and you probably already saw this, but is this who you are looking for? 

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=26442211

It seems she may have been involved with the Elk Rapids Historical Society. 

http://elkrapidshistory.org/home0.aspx 

Sorry if this is repetitive or wrong!

that is her, she was very involved, i was just hoping someone knew of the books and could tell me what they’re called

alrighty, i got some info from my grandma about my dad’s side of the family and maybe need a little help from everyone to track something down?  My nokomis had a sister named Fern Barnes (Married name Zeman) who apparently wrote a couple of books on our family and the indigenous folk of michigan in general.  These were published in the 60’s and for obvious reasons weren’t popular enough to print a billion copies, so I’m having trouble finding these books.  If you even just know the names of the books, that would be a ton of help.  She also apparently helped make a film called “The River’s the Same”(1975) that seems to only exist in the library of michigan as far as I can tell.  If I can find those books, it will be the linchpin for my status petition, methinks.

thisisnotjapan:

-By Sharon H. Chang

When I wrote my first post for Hyphen, Talking Mixed-Race Identity with Young Children, I was deliberately blunt about race. I wrote about how I don’t tell my multiracial son, who presents as a racial minority, that he’s white — but I do tell him he’s Asian. While the essay resonated with many people, others made comments like this: 

“Your child is as white as he is Asian… Why embrace one label and not the other?”

“Why is he Asian but not white? He has white ancestors as much as Asian ones. So if it’s OK to call him Asian, it’s OK to call him white. Or, if it’s not OK to call him white (because he’s not completely white) then it’s not OK to call him Asian, because he’s not completely Asian either.”

“Your child is neither white nor Asian. I once heard this description: When you have a glass of milk and add chocolate to it, you no longer have just a glass of milk and you no longer just have chocolate because you have created something completely different. A bi-racial or multi-racial child is not either/or.”

In the 1990s, psychologist and mixed-race scholar Maria P.P. Root wrote the famous Bill of Rights for People of Mixed Heritage, stirred by her examination of mixed-race identity, interviews with hundreds of multiracial folk across the U.S., and the struggles multiracial people face in forming and claiming a positive sense of self. “I have the right not to justify my existence to the world,” it reads. “To identify myself differently than strangers expect me to identify. To create a vocabulary about being multiracial or multiethnic.”

Almost two decades later, these proclamations still ring so true. Some people are completely unwilling to honor my family’s choice to identify as mixed-race and Asian because it doesn’t align with their own ideas about how we should identify. The right of a mixed-race person to self-construct and self-define, even today, endures continual policing from people with their own agendas.

If it’s not OK to call him white…then it’s not OK to call him Asian”; “Your child is neither white nor Asian.” These critiques are so often centered on whiteness: a sense of disbelief that I would “deny” it to my son, and the conviction that, if I won’t teach him he is white too — or at least partly white — then he is nothing at all. Even the problematic chocolate milk analogy — which the commenter clearly thought was progressive — begins with a glass of white milk with “color” added. White is seen as normative, and there is a total failure to recognize that racial categories are political

Of course I talk to my son about our white family members who are a part of his life and his identity. But those stories are about growing up in Virginia, or window candles at Christmastime in New England, or his Slovakian great-great-grandmother who came through Ellis Island alone when she was sixteen. Those stories are about our history, not about being “white.” “White” is not an ethnic celebration, a food festival, or a heritage parade. It’s about having unearned power and privilege based on the way you look.

In Dr. Peggy McIntosh’s famous essay on white privilege, she listed a series of unearned privileges white people enjoy. Among them: “I can if I wish arrange to be in the company of people of my race most of the time”; “I can turn on the television or open to the front page of the paper and see people of my race widely represented”; “I can speak in public to a powerful male group without putting my race on trial”; and “I can be pretty sure that if I ask to talk to the ‘person in charge,’ I will be facing a person of my race.” Are any of these true of my multiracial Asian son? My son, who barely has any children’s books that reflect his racial image, who is constantly scanned and assessed aloud based on “how Asian” he looks, my son who has had many more white teachers than teachers of color? 

Telling my child he’s white also won’t help him understand why children who were less than one-quarter Japanese were interned during World War II; why a stranger would look at him and say there are no “pure races” anymore; why a leading theatre company in our city unabashedly staged a yellowface production of an operetta; why kids on the playground pull back their eyes in a slant and spit out one of those ridiculous anti-Asian chants that just won’t go away. When I tell my son that he is Asian, mixed-race, multiracial, and a person of color, I’m not denying him parts of his ancestral-ethnic heritage. I’m teaching him about the race politics that intrude upon our lives whether we want them to or not. I’m preparing him to exist in a world that obstinately persists in being racially divided. And I’m trying to let him know something about the ways he has and will continue to be judged throughout his life, not because he’s white — but because he’s mixed with color.

feralfawn:

elisdraws:

a hedgehog

I identify with this guy a lot.

feralfawn:

elisdraws:

a hedgehog

I identify with this guy a lot.

I don't know who Ayn Rand is. Should I change that or just let it lie?
Anonymous

raptorific:

Imagine the baby that would result from a night of passion between Ebenezer Scrooge (before the spirits changed his ways) and Mr. Krabs from Spongebob. Now imagine that baby grew up and married the baby that would result from a night of passion between Yzma from the Emperor’s New Groove and Mr. Burns from the Simpsons. Now imagine the newlyweds had a baby of their own, and that baby was raised aboard a Ferengi Starship, where she was tutored in empathy and compassion by Lord Voldemort. Now imagine that baby grew up and someone told her that any opinions she might have or conclusions she might reach are based on objective logic and reason, and that anyone who disagrees with her is simply being irrational. Now multiply that person’s greed and heartlessness by 100 and you’ll begin to see something that comes close to resembling Ayn Rand.

baapi-makwa:

makwa gaye ma’iingan (bear and wolf) .. I’ve lost track of the times I have redrawn this.

baapi-makwa:

makwa gaye ma’iingan (bear and wolf) .. I’ve lost track of the times I have redrawn this.